Review: Legacy of Evil by Sharon Buchbinder

NEW BOOK RELEASE !!
The exciting next installment from the Hotel LaBelle Series by Sharon Buchbinder
Legacy of Evil Tour Graphic
LEGACY OF EVIL
Sharon Buchbinder
Series: Hotel LaBelle Series Book 2
Genre: Paranormal Romance
Publisher: The Wild Rose Press
Publication Date: October 13, 2017
Legacy of Evil
One battle, one outcome. Who will win? Good or evil?
When a wild mustang is shot in Montana, renowned horse whisperer and telepath, Emma Horserider, is called in to calm the herd and find out what happened. Once on scene she is almost killed by a bullet-spewing drone, and calls her black ops brother for back-up.
Emma’s help roars into her life covered in tattoos and riding a Harley. Remote viewer Bronco Winchester takes the assignment because he is ordered to, but he wonders what type of assistance, his boss’s sister needs. That is until he sees Emma, a valiant Warrior Woman proud of her Crow heritage.
Posing as a married couple, Emma and Bronco go undercover to infiltrate and stop a hate group. Both are anxious enough without the now growing attachment they feel for one another. When the lives of many are on the line, they are not sure if they will live or die—let alone have a chance at love.

Review

LEGACY OF EVIL is a highly entertaining and enjoyable story, also educational for me, because like Bronco, I’ve had a bad education in Native American stuff. I learned a lot in this book, and I especially like the Indian telegraph. There’s a kind of homey and sense of belonging in being part of a community like Emma’s. There’s also a certain subtle humor threading throughout the story that made me chuckle or at times, outright laugh out loud.

Sharon Buchbinder has created an unforgettable heroine in Emma Horserider. She’s bold and brave and I’m thoroughly jealous of her ability to communicate with horses and dogs. I love Bronco as well. These characters are fleshed-out and three-dimensional, well-rounded with layers that are peeled open as the story unfolds. They’re certainly different from most characters in the books I usually read.

Speaking of characters, there are noteworthy secondary characters here like Stephanie (Emma’s cousin), Beautiful Blackfeather (Emma’s ancestor) and let’s not forget Gaucho the bobcat! I’m not saying more; let’s just say you have to read this to appreciate them.

Overall, entertaining and unforgettable characters make this a recommended read!

Rating: 5 stars Continue reading

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Review: 50 Hours by Loree Lough

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50 HOURS is a powerful, uplifting story about hope, friendship, love, courage, and the amazing resiliency of the human spirit.

Franco’s life changed the moment he served his 50 hours community service at Savannah Falls Hospice. Before that, he was an angry man who grieved his wife’s death, especially on the day of her death anniversary. When he arrived at the hospice, he was determined to keep his head down and finish his service so he could get on with his life. But the moment he heard a woman (Aubrey) being bullied, he couldn’t help but go to her aid, despite it being unwanted and could potentially get himself in trouble (entering a resident’s room is against the rules).

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Review: Letters to the Lost by Brigid Kemmerer

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LETTERS TO THE LOST is a compelling, emotion-filled read, maybe better read by more mature YA. However, even while the letters started because Juliet lost her mother, this book doesn’t only deal with death and the resulting grief, but also the wider themes of fate and choice.

The first few chapters were raw with emotion, especially the letters, and especially where Juliet used photographs to convey certain thoughts or feelings. The main characters are not your usual teens; having lost people important to them, they’re deeper, weightier, sounding almost like mature grown ups (because there are immature ones), especially in their letters where they’d discuss fate and choosing paths. I thought there was a bit of disparity in their real selves and the selves in their letters, but I suppose that’s only to be expected because somehow it’s easier to let a stranger see your real self without the barriers and prejudices of a lot of things that come with knowing who the other person is. (You’ll understand what I’m talking about when you read the book)

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Review: Love Like the Movies by Victoria Van Tiem

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It’s rare to read a book that touches you on so many levels. LOVE LIKE THE MOVIES is more than a rom-com; it’s about love, life and choices–the ones we make and the ones that are forced upon us. And courage, of course.

Kensington Shaw finally has the boyfriend that’s guaranteed to win her battles with her family. Bradley Connors is the one…or so she thinks until her ex, Shane Bennett, comes back into her life. To secure her job, she has to make nice with Shane (who’s hiring her agency), and if it includes living–acting out–movie moments with him, then she’s game. But what happens when these scenes reach inside to rediscover the girl who’s been hiding beneath all these years? Continue reading

Review: Confessions of a Former Puck Bunny by Cindi Madsen

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Cindi Madsen takes us on a wild, thrilling ride in CONFESSIONS OF A FORMER PUCK BUNNY, which is unexpectedly fun to read.

Lindsay is a great narrator; I love her voice and her strength, especially the way she turned her life around and made the goal of pursuing her dream. More than her though, I love Ryder, especially the way that Lindsay’s past didn’t matter to him, and that he only wants “her future”. If only more men were like him! Both characters are lovable and relatable, and I kept rooting for them all the way! Continue reading

Review: The Librarian and the Spy by Susan Mann

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I was intrigued by the summary–I mean, a librarian caught up in spy games–and I took a chance, and boy, was I glad I did! THE LIBRARIAN AND THE SPY exceeded my expectations, being a compelling read with original, unforgettable characters.

Susan Mann seamlessly weaved popular culture (Harry Potter, LOTR, etc… the only thing lacking was Game of Thrones) into Quinn’s and James’s conversation, and their banter and quips were quick and lively and engaging. Quinn is an amazing heroine–refreshing and strong and confident in herself. I love how she totally loved books (kindred spirit there!) and how they need her mad librarian skills to solve the mystery. I also love the way she lived and breathed spy novels–it’s in her every pore and pours out in her conversation and actions. I thought she, the untrained civilian, would overshadow James the spy, but I was glad to see James held his own in the end. Continue reading

Review: Brother’s Ruin by Emma Newman

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BROTHER’S RUIN is my first in the gaslamp fantasy (sub)genre, and I was intrigued and fascinated all at the same time. I love the mix of magic with the historical era, in this case, Victorian, if I’m not mistaken. This is a novella introducing the Industrial Magic series, and it’s a good first book in the series, as I want the next one now!

In Charlotte’s world, people who show magic–especially one as powerful as hers–are often taken away to be trained in the Royal Society of Esoteric Arts. While the mages are then trained to control their magic, the downside is that they lose their freedom. Or so Charlotte believes. Thus, she hides her magic, but when her father became indebted and needed money, he had no choice but to report her brother, Benjamin, who had exhibited some talent so that the family could be compensated for “losing” their son to the arts. But Ben isn’t the talented one, but his sister… Continue reading