Review: The Scandalous, Dissolute, No-Good Mr. Wright by Tessa Dare

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Tessa Dare has unbelievably beautiful prose, and she showcased it here once again in THE SCANDALOUS, DISSOLUTE, NO-GOOD MR. WRIGHT. It made for delicious reading, as we are swept away into an engaging romance with a delightful heroine and her equally delightful, yet roguish, hero.

Miss Eliza Cade isn’t allowed to come out until her three older sisters are all wed. In the meantime, she keeps bumping into Mr. Wright, who seems to recognize in her a kindred spirit.

I like Eliza, who is a spirited girl, lively and full of sass, which more often than not gets her into trouble. While her family doesn’t understand her, Mr. J. Harrison Wright does, becoming a (sort of) friend as they encountered each other over the years. He teases her, provokes her, and in the end, he couldn’t resist her. And though he may be a rogue and a scoundel, Harry is in fact, quite kind and patient, and has his own brand of honor.

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Review: Once Upon a Winter’s Eve by Tessa Dare

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Another keeper from Tessa Dare! She crafts characters that worm their way into your hearts, hook their nails in and stay for a long visit.

Violet Winterbottom suffered The Disappointment, which was why she was in Spindle Cove, a place for spinsters. After a year in hiding, her family was exasperated with her and was calling her back to London in order to marry her off. On the eve of her departure, at a Christmas ball, an injured stranger crashed the ball and collapsed at her feet. He was speaking a strange language, and only Violet, who knew at least 6 languages, could decipher what he said. Also, he looked strangely familiar. Could he be…?

I read with bated breath as I strove to find out the answers together with Violet. Could he be The Disappointment? But how had this happened when he was in the West Indies, half a world away? Continue reading

Review: A Week to Be Wicked by Tessa Dare

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A WEEK TO BE WICKED is simply magical! This is what romance should be! Tessa Dare has outdone herself with this delightful and thrilling romance between two unlikely souls who complemented each other to perfection.

Bookish Minerva Highwood can’t compare to her lovely, refined, elegant sister, so she focused her attention to the study of rocks. She’d just found the footprint of a giant lizard that she was sure would change the way the world view its history, and she needed to give her presentation at the symposium, where she hoped to make a name for herself as a serious geologist and gain the accolades of her peers. For this, she needs someone to protect her on her travels and who better than Colin Sandhurst, the man with whom she’d bickered during their entire time in Spindle Cove? Continue reading

Review: Shadowsong by S. Jae-Jones

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I loved the previous book, Wintersong, and while I was hoping for a sequel, I also thought the story could end there. But when SHADOWSONG was announced, I was hopping mad to get a copy, eager to revisit the Underground, and hoping for a happy ending for the Goblin King and Liesl.

As a whole, Wintersong came across as a tightly plotted story, while SHADOWSONG seems a bit scattered. There was none of the intensity of the previous book. Maybe it was because of the mystery initially presented–what’s with the dying people being found with silver frost on their lips? Who’s the green-eyed woman? What’s happening with Josef, and what seems to be up with Liesl, who seems to be distant in this book? And as I read on, the story starts to captivate me, maybe not as much as Wintersong, but enough to ensure that I would forge onward to the very last page. Continue reading

Review: The Duchess Deal by Tessa Dare

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It’s always a great pleasure to read any one of Tessa Dare’s books, not the least of which is the witty banter between her main characters, and her prose, which is also witty, refreshing and almost poetic.

“I’ll take you home. My carriage is just outside.”
“Thank you, I prefer to walk.”
“More convenient still. My feet are even closer than the carriage.”

*****

He’d gone beyond anger, sailed straight past rage, and crashed into a place of primal fury, where blood ran in colors he hadn’t known to exist.

*****

They found themselves alone, the three of them. Emma, the duke, and a thick, uncomfortable silence.

And there are lots more peppered throughout the entire story.

THE DUCHESS DEAL is a reimagining of the fairy tale Beauty and the Beast in historical England, where the Beast is not a prince, but a duke (Ash) who got his scars in the war. Beauty is Emma, a vicar’s daughter turned seamstress, who was exactly what the lonely duke needs. But THE DUCHESS DEAL is more than the fairy tale; it goes much deeper to plumb at the hurt and insecurity on Ash’s side, and how, underneath his beastly appearance, he is very much a man in need of love. Continue reading

Review: Godsgrave by Jay Kristoff

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All I can say is “Wow!” I’m speechless with wonder, with awe at the twists and turns the story had taken. Though I’m expecting things not to go swimmingly for Mia, I never imagined the routes the plot would take to bring her to where she was by the end of the book.

Mia just keeps on evolving throughout the series. In the first book, she is out for revenge against the three men who are instrumental in murdering her family. In the second book, she has not forgotten this purpose, yet, she now sees other things, too, like how the riches that are enjoyed by the few are provided by broken backs and blood of the many. And what she has seen, she cannot forget. What would Mia do about these things, if she even can? Continue reading

Review: Nevernight by Jay Kristoff

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I had this book in my Kindle for months, and my thought when I finally cracked it open was: Why did I just start this now?

But better late than never.

NEVERNIGHT is a compelling, surprisingly delightful novel about assassins (is there an oxymoron there somewhere?). The author painted a sympathetic picture of the heroine, who though she trained to be an assassin to avenge her family, never quite lost her humanity.

The worldbuilding is superb, the story intricately plotted–the twist at the end totally took me by surprise. Love it!! The footnotes are a nice touch; they added history and depth to the world. And humor/comic relief, though Mister Kindly had that job, too. Or…could it be…that he’s the narrator? Continue reading